Who we are

The Commission is an independent body of experts drawn from frontbench UK politics, senior management roles in financial services, businesses and the charity sector, national regulators and academia.

Our mission

Customer in motorcycle shop paying

The Commission is working to champion financial inclusion as a public policy priority. We work with policy makers and a wide range of stakeholders, to come up with deliverable policy proposals.

Financial exclusion remains a significant challenge for 21st century Britain, a nation which prides itself on being a global leader in financial services. But more needs to be done, with over 2 million people still without access to a bank account.

The Commission is supported by MasterCard but remains wholly independent. We are supported by a range of stakeholders across industry, government, regulation and the third sector, providing leadership and coordination between different stakeholder groups, and driving forward change to ultimately improve the state of the nation’s financial wellbeing.

The Commission initially came together ahead of the General Election with the aim of putting the issue in the minds of policy makers. We are now committed to campaigning around the importance of financial inclusion.

Core Commission objectives

  1. Champion financial inclusion as a public policy priority
  2. Work with policy makers and a wide range of stakeholders, to come up with deliverable policy proposals

How does the commission work?

Supported by a range of stakeholders across industry, government, regulation and the third sector, the Commission provides leadership and coordination between different stakeholder groups, and drives forward change to ultimately improve the state of the nation’s financial wellbeing.

 

The Commission initially came together ahead of the General Election with the aim of putting the issue in the minds of policy makers. In the run up to the election the Commission: took evidence from policy experts and those working with the financial excluded; formed an expert advisory panel to guide its work; and published and promoted its recommendations in a report “Financial inclusion: improving the financial health of the nation”

 

Work will now continue, in order to keep the issue there. It is supported by MasterCard but is wholly independent.

Why does it matter?

Financial inclusion is essential for anyone wanting to participate fairly and fully in everyday life. Without access to appropriate mainstream financial services, people pay more for goods and services and have less choice. The impacts of exclusion are not just financial but also affect education, employment, health, housing, and overall well-being. The changing context of increased digital delivery, squeezed household budgets, and welfare reform threatens to exacerbate exclusion.